Magnitude 2.5 Earthquake Struck 0 km SSW of Tilleur, Belgium on June 19, 2008 03:12:22

Last Updated: 2014-11-07 01:36:23

On June 19, 2008 03:12:22 an earthquake with magnitude of 2.5 on the richter scale hit 0 km SSW of Tilleur, Belgium. The earthquake originated at a depth of approximately 10.0 kilometers below the Earth's surface on longitude 5.537Β° and latitude 50.610Β°. According to documented reports people felt the earth quake, No tsunami was triggered due to the earthquake.

Magnitude & Depth

The earthquake that appeared on June 19, 2008 03:12:22 had a magnitude of 2.5 on the richter scale. Which is considered to be a minor earthquake and is often felt but causes little to no damage.

Shallow earthquakes are considered between 0 and 70 km deep, while intermediate earthquakes range from 70 - 300 km deep and deep earthquakes are between 300 - 700 km deep.

Are shallow earthquakes more destructive?

Shallow quakes generally tend to be more damaging than deeper quakes. Seismic waves from deep quakes have to travel farther to the surface, losing energy along the way.

Nearby Cities and Towns

The nearest significant population center is Seraing in Wallonia, Belgium, located 3 kilometers or 2 miles ↓ S of the earthquake's epicenter. Other cities in close proximity include Mons-lez-LiΓ¨ge (Wallonia, Belgium) located 5 km (3 mi) ← W and FlΓ©malle-Haute (Wallonia, Belgium) located 6 km (4 mi) ↙ SW of the epicenter.

In total, we found 169 cities in our database that might have been impacted by the earthquake.

Distance Direction City State Country
3 km (2 mi) ↓ S Seraing Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
5 km (3 mi) ← W Mons-lez-LiΓ¨ge Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
6 km (4 mi) ↙ SW FlΓ©malle-Haute Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
8 km (5 mi) β†˜ SE Esneux Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
10 km (6 mi) ↙ SW Engis Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
14 km (8 mi) ↓ S Nandrin Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
14 km (8 mi) ↓ S Anthisnes Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
15 km (9 mi) ↙ SW Verlaine Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
15 km (9 mi) β†˜ SE Comblain-au-Pont Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
17 km (10 mi) ↙ SW Amay Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
18 km (11 mi) ↓ S Tinlot Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
19 km (12 mi) ↙ SW Villers-le-Bouillet Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
19 km (12 mi) ↓ S Ouffet Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
20 km (12 mi) ↓ S Hamoir Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
23 km (14 mi) β†˜ SE FerriΓ¨res Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
23 km (14 mi) ↙ SW Huy Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
24 km (15 mi) ↓ S Modave Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
24 km (15 mi) ↙ SW Wanze Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
26 km (16 mi) ↓ S Clavier Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
26 km (16 mi) ↙ SW Marchin Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
28 km (17 mi) ← W Braives Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
29 km (18 mi) ↓ S Durbuy Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
31 km (19 mi) ↙ SW HΓ©ron Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
32 km (20 mi) ↓ S Havelange Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
32 km (20 mi) ↓ S Somme-Leuze Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
32 km (20 mi) ↙ SW Burdinne Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
33 km (21 mi) ↙ SW Andenne Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
35 km (21 mi) β†˜ SE Γ‰rezΓ©e Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
35 km (21 mi) ↙ SW Ohey Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
37 km (23 mi) ← W Wasseiges Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
38 km (23 mi) ↙ SW Forville Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
38 km (24 mi) ↓ S Hotton Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
39 km (24 mi) ↙ SW Noville-les-Bois Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
40 km (24 mi) ↙ SW Gesves Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
40 km (25 mi) ↓ S Hamois Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
41 km (26 mi) ↓ S Rendeux Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
44 km (27 mi) ↓ S Marche-en-Famenne Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
44 km (27 mi) ↙ SW Γ‰ghezΓ©e Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
45 km (28 mi) ↙ SW Assesse Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
46 km (29 mi) ↓ S Ciney Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
47 km (29 mi) β†˜ SE La Roche-en-Ardenne Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
49 km (31 mi) ↙ SW Namur Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
51 km (31 mi) ← W Perwez Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
54 km (33 mi) ↓ S Rochefort Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
54 km (33 mi) ↙ SW Profondeville Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
55 km (34 mi) ↓ S Nassogne Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
56 km (34 mi) ↙ SW Yvoir Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
57 km (35 mi) ↓ S Tenneville Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
57 km (35 mi) ↙ SW AnhΓ©e Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
58 km (36 mi) ↙ SW Floreffe Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
58 km (36 mi) ↙ SW Province de Namur Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
59 km (36 mi) ↙ SW Gembloux Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
59 km (36 mi) ↙ SW Dinant Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
60 km (37 mi) ↓ S Houyet Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
63 km (39 mi) ← W Chastre-Villeroux-Blanmont Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
63 km (39 mi) ↓ S Tellin Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
64 km (39 mi) ↙ SW Onhaye Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
64 km (39 mi) ↙ SW Fosses-la-Ville Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
65 km (40 mi) ↓ S Saint-Hubert Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
65 km (40 mi) ↓ S Sainte-Ode Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
66 km (41 mi) ↙ SW HastiΓ¨re-Lavaux Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
66 km (41 mi) ↙ SW Sombreffe Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
66 km (41 mi) ↓ S Wellin Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
67 km (42 mi) ↓ S Province du Luxembourg Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
69 km (43 mi) ↙ SW Mettet Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
69 km (42 mi) ↓ S Beauraing Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
69 km (43 mi) ↙ SW La BruyΓ¨re Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
70 km (43 mi) ↙ SW Aiseau Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
71 km (44 mi) ↓ S Daverdisse Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
71 km (44 mi) ↙ SW Fleurus Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
72 km (44 mi) ↙ SW Villers-la-Ville Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
72 km (44 mi) ↓ S Fromelennes Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
72 km (45 mi) ↓ S Givet Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
72 km (45 mi) ↓ S Libin Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
73 km (45 mi) ↙ SW Farciennes Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
74 km (46 mi) ↙ SW ChΓ’telet Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
76 km (47 mi) ← W Genappe Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
77 km (48 mi) ↙ SW Gerpinnes Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
77 km (48 mi) ↙ SW Doische Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
77 km (47 mi) ↙ SW Florennes Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
77 km (48 mi) β†˜ SE Vaux-sur-SΓ»re Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
78 km (49 mi) ↙ SW Brunehault Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
80 km (49 mi) ↙ SW Charleroi Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
81 km (50 mi) ↓ S Gedinne Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
82 km (50 mi) ↓ S Vireux-Wallerand Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
82 km (51 mi) ↓ S Vireux-Molhain Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
83 km (51 mi) ↓ S BiΓ¨vre Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
83 km (52 mi) ↙ SW Courcelles Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
83 km (51 mi) ↙ SW Pont-Γ -Celles Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
83 km (51 mi) ↓ S Paliseul Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
84 km (52 mi) ↙ SW Philippeville Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
85 km (53 mi) ↓ S NeufchΓ’teau Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
85 km (53 mi) ↙ SW Nivelles Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
86 km (53 mi) ↓ S Bertrix Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
87 km (54 mi) ↙ SW Walcourt Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
89 km (55 mi) ↙ SW Chapelle-lez-Herlaimont Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
89 km (55 mi) ↓ S Haybes Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
90 km (56 mi) ↓ S Fumay Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
90 km (56 mi) ↙ SW Seneffe Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
90 km (55 mi) ↓ S LΓ©glise Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
92 km (57 mi) ↙ SW Manage Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
92 km (57 mi) ↙ SW Anderlues Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
92 km (57 mi) ↙ SW Morlanwelz-Mariemont Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
93 km (58 mi) ↙ SW Thuin Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
93 km (58 mi) ↙ SW Cerfontaine Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
94 km (58 mi) ↓ S Les Hautes-RiviΓ¨res Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
94 km (58 mi) ↙ SW Lobbes Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
94 km (58 mi) ↓ S Herbeumont Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
96 km (59 mi) ↙ SW Couvin Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
96 km (60 mi) ↓ S Bouillon Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
96 km (60 mi) ↓ S Thilay Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
97 km (60 mi) ↓ S Chiny Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
98 km (61 mi) β†˜ SE Habay-la-Vieille Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
98 km (61 mi) ↓ S Revin Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
98 km (61 mi) ↓ S MonthermΓ© Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
99 km (62 mi) ↙ SW Froidchapelle Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
100 km (62 mi) ↙ SW Beaumont Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
100 km (62 mi) ↓ S Deville Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
101 km (62 mi) ↓ S Gespunsart Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
102 km (63 mi) ↓ S Florenville Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
103 km (64 mi) ↓ S Neufmanil Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
103 km (64 mi) ↓ S Tintigny Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
104 km (65 mi) ↓ S Rocroi Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
104 km (64 mi) β†˜ SE Γ‰talle Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
104 km (65 mi) ↓ S Nouzonville Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
106 km (65 mi) ↓ S Saint-Menges Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
106 km (66 mi) ↙ SW Chimay Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
107 km (66 mi) ↓ S Floing Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
107 km (67 mi) ↓ S Pouru-Saint-Remy Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
107 km (66 mi) ↓ S Aiglemont Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
108 km (67 mi) ↓ S Renwez Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
108 km (67 mi) ↓ S Montcy-Notre-Dame Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
108 km (67 mi) ↓ S Vrigne-aux-Bois Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
108 km (67 mi) ↓ S Saint-Laurent Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
109 km (68 mi) ↓ S Charleville-MΓ©ziΓ¨res Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
109 km (68 mi) ↓ S Sedan Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
109 km (68 mi) ↓ S Vivier-au-Court Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
110 km (68 mi) ↓ S Tournes Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
110 km (68 mi) ↓ S Douzy Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
110 km (68 mi) ↓ S Balan Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
111 km (69 mi) ↓ S Rimogne Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
111 km (69 mi) ↓ S Villers-Semeuse Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
111 km (69 mi) ↓ S Bazeilles Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
111 km (68 mi) ↓ S Warcq Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
111 km (69 mi) ↓ S Carignan Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
111 km (69 mi) ↓ S Meix-devant-Virton Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
111 km (69 mi) ↓ S Lumes Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
112 km (69 mi) ↓ S Prix-lΓ¨s-MΓ©ziΓ¨res Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
112 km (69 mi) ↓ S Donchery Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
112 km (69 mi) ↓ S Blagny Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
114 km (70 mi) ↓ S La Francheville Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
114 km (71 mi) ↓ S Dom-le-Mesnil Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
114 km (70 mi) ↓ S Nouvion-sur-Meuse Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
115 km (71 mi) ↓ S Flize Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
115 km (71 mi) ↓ S Virton Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
116 km (72 mi) ↓ S Mouzon Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
119 km (73 mi) ↙ SW Signy-le-Petit Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
119 km (74 mi) ↓ S Rouvroy Wallonia πŸ‡§πŸ‡ͺ Belgium
121 km (75 mi) ↓ S MontmΓ©dy Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
125 km (78 mi) ↓ S Ardennes Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
126 km (78 mi) ↓ S Stenay Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
129 km (80 mi) β†˜ SE Longuyon Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
143 km (89 mi) ↓ S Attigny Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
147 km (91 mi) ↓ S Vouziers Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
148 km (92 mi) ↓ S Rethel Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
149 km (92 mi) ↓ S Sault-lΓ¨s-Rethel Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
151 km (94 mi) ↓ S ChΓ’teau-Porcien Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
168 km (104 mi) ↓ S Warmeriville Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France
170 km (105 mi) ↓ S Pontfaverger-Moronvilliers Grand-Est πŸ‡«πŸ‡· France

Nearby Power Plants

We found a total 31 utility-scale power plants in the vecinity of the earthquakes epicenter. Ranging form closest to furtherst, one of these is a neaclear power plant.

Distance Direction Power Plant Type Capacity
3 km (2 mi) β†— NE ANGLEUR TG 41 Gas 128.0 MW
5 km (3 mi) ↙ SW HU IVOZ-RAMET Hydro 10.0 MW
8 km (5 mi) ↙ SW AWIRS 4 Biomass 95.0 MW
19 km (11 mi) ↙ SW HU AMPSIN-NEUVILLE Hydro 9.9 MW
20 km (12 mi) ↙ SW TIHANGE 1N Nuclear 962.0 MW
20 km (12 mi) ↙ SW TIHANGE 3 Nuclear 2053.8 MW
35 km (22 mi) ↙ SW HU ANDENNE Hydro 9.0 MW
47 km (29 mi) ↙ SW HU GRAND-MALADES Hydro 5.0 MW
78 km (48 mi) ↓ S CHOOZ Nuclear 3000.0 MW
82 km (51 mi) ↙ SW Marcinelle Energie (Carsid) Gas 405.0 MW
83 km (51 mi) ↙ SW Amercoeur 1 R TGV Gas 451.0 MW
94 km (58 mi) ↙ SW PLATE TAILLE T Hydro 144.0 MW
96 km (59 mi) ↙ SW Froidchapelle Wind Wind 25.0 MW
98 km (61 mi) ↓ S La Vierre Hydro 1.9 MW
101 km (63 mi) ↓ S REVIN Hydro 808.0 MW
113 km (70 mi) ↙ SW Γ‰teigniΓ¨res Biomass 1.48 MW
115 km (71 mi) ↓ S Vaux-lΓ¨s-Mouzon Wind 7.269 MW
120 km (74 mi) ↙ SW Tarzy Wind 8.0 MW
120 km (74 mi) ↓ S Raucourt-et-Flaba Wind 12.0 MW
122 km (75 mi) β†˜ SE Allondrelle-la-Malmaison Wind 10.76 MW
123 km (76 mi) ↙ SW Champlin Wind 27.5 MW
125 km (78 mi) ↓ S Stenay Wind 11.5 MW
144 km (89 mi) ↓ S Sorbon Wind 6.6 MW
147 km (91 mi) ↓ S Γ‰cly Wind 10.0 MW
148 km (92 mi) ↓ S Saulces-Champenoises Wind 20.0 MW
148 km (92 mi) ↓ S Barby Wind 10.0 MW
150 km (93 mi) ↓ S ChΓ’teau-Porcien Wind 10.0 MW
153 km (95 mi) ↓ S Leffincourt Wind 20.0 MW
153 km (95 mi) ↓ S Contreuve Wind 12.0 MW
157 km (97 mi) ↓ S Saint-Loup-en-Champagne Wind 26.0 MW
168 km (104 mi) ↓ S BΓ©theniville Solar 5.3238 MW

Power Plants & Risks During Earthquakes

We found 6 types of power plants in the vecinity of the magnitude 2.5 earthquake that struck 0 km SSW of Tilleur, Belgium on June 19, 2008 03:12:22. These types were Biomass power plants, Wind power plants, Nuclear power plants, Gas power plants, Solar power plants, Hydro power plants, below you find information how each type of power plant can pose a risk to you as a person or the ecosytem around you.

None of this information should be used as guidence in an event of an emergency, but rather as additional references to information provided by national, state and local authorities.

Hydropower

Hydropower plants are generally considered as safe in many aspects, but when it comes to severe earthquakes they pose a substantial risk that can manifest in the form of dam faliours, landslides and grave impacts on surrounding ecosystems.

Dam Failure

The most significant risk is the potential failure of the dam that holds the water reservoir. Severe ground shaking can damage or breach the dam, leading to downstream flooding and as a result endangering people and wildlife living downstream. Such an event can also have severe impact on key infrastructure that cascades through society.

Landslides

Earthquakes can trigger landslides in the areas surrounding hydropower plants, potentially damaging infrastructure and causing harm to nearby communities.

Damage to Aquatic Ecosystems

Both landslide and dam failures can have a severe impact on upstream and downstream aquatic wildlife, ecosystem and groundwater, resulting in longterm risks for people and industires living and operating in areas near the water supply.

To mitigate these risks, engineering and construction standards for hydropower plants often include earthquake-resistant designs. These designs incorporate measures such as flexible foundations, strengthened dam structures, and advanced monitoring systems to detect early signs of stress. Additionally, emergency plans and evacuation procedures should be in place to protect personnel and downstream communities in the event of a severe earthquake.

Nuclean Power

Nuclear power plant bear an inherent risk during earthquake events, as we all witnessed on 11 of Mars 2011 in Fukushima. However, According to the World Nuclear Association, nuclear facilities are designed to witstand earthquakes.

"Nuclear facilities are designed so that earthquakes and other external events will not jeopardise the safety of the plant. In France for instance, nuclear plants are designed to withstand an earthquake twice as strong as the 1000-year event calculated for each site. It is estimated that, worldwide, 20% of nuclear reactors are operating in areas of significant seismic activity. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a Safety Guide on Seismic Risks for Nuclear Power Plants. Various systems are used in planning, including Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA), which is recommended by IAEA and widely accepted."

"Peak ground acceleration (PGA) or design basis earthquake ground motion (DBGM) is measured in Galileo units – Gal (cm/sec2) or g – the force of gravity, one g being 980 Gal. PGA has long been considered an unsatisfactory indicator of damage to structures, and some seismologists are proposing to replace it with cumulative average velocity (CAV) as a more useful metric than ground acceleration since it brings in displacement and duration and "operators are able to determine the absence of potential damages with high confidence" according to the IAEA."

"The logarithmic Richter magnitude scale (or more precisely the Moment Magnitude Scale more generally used today*) measures the overall energy released in an earthquake, and there is not always a good correlation between that and intensity (ground motion) in a particular place. Japan has a seismic intensity scale in shindo units 0 to 7, with weak/strong divisions at levels 5 and 6, hence ten levels. This describes the surface intensity at particular places, rather than the magnitude of the earthquake itself."

Gas Power

Gas power plants can pose significant risks to people and the environment in their vicinity during earthquakes.

Gas Leaks and Fires

Gas power plants rely on natural gas, which can leak from pipelines and equipment when damaged by seismic activity. These leaks can lead to fires and explosions, endangering people in the plant's vicinity.

Impact on Air Quality

Gas power plants emit pollutants, and fires caused by gas leaks during an earthquake can release harmful substances into the air. This can pose health risks to nearby residents.

Environmental Impact

Gas leaks can also harm the local environment, potentially contaminating soil and water sources.

To mitigate these risks, most modern gas power plants have robust safety measures in place, including gas leak detection systems, emergency response plans, and communication protocols to alert nearby communities in case of an incident. Additionally, local authorities should conduct risk assessments and ensure that emergency services are well-prepared to respond to potential hazards posed by gas power plants during earthquakes.

Solar Power

Solar power plants generally pose fewer risks compared to conventional power plants that use fossil fuels or nuclear energy. However, they are not without their own set of potential risks and challenges. Below you can find some of the risks associated with solar power plants in an event of a severe earthquake.

Environmental Impact

The production of solar panels involves the use of various materials, including rare metals and chemicals. Severe earthquakes could potentially introduce these into the ecosystems of their location.

Fire Risk

Although the solar panels themselves are not typically a fire hazard, electrical components like inverters and batterises that store the electricity can pose a risk. Electrical malfunctions or faults can lead to fires, especially in poorly maintained systems in an event of a severe earthquake, and thus pose a longterm risk for the local ecosystem.

Overall, the mitigation of risks associated with utility-scale solar power plants involves a combination of technological advancements, sustainable practices, regulatory adherence, and ongoing monitoring and maintenance.

Wind Power

In the event of a severe earthquake, wind power plants typically pose lower risks to people and ecosystems compared to some other types of power generation, such as nuclear or fossil fuel power plants. Below you'll find potential risks to still consider.

Turbine Collapse

The most significant risk to people is the potential collapse of wind turbine towers during a severe earthquake. If a wind turbine were to collapse, it could cause injury or loss of life to anyone in the vicinity.

Wildlife Impact

Wind turbines can pose a risk to local wildlife. In the event of an earthquake, there could be concerns about the displacement or injury of wildlife in the vicinity of the turbines or wild fires resulting from internal malfunction of turbines.

While wind power plants do have risks associated with earthquakes, they are generally considered to be a lower-risk energy source in terms of environmental and safety concerns when compared to certain other forms of power generation. Proper planning, engineering, and maintenance practices help mitigate these risks and ensure the safe operation of wind power plants during earthquakes.

Biomass Power

Biomass power plants, which generate electricity by burning organic materials like wood, agricultural residues, or waste, can pose certain risks during earthquakes. While biomass power plants are generally considered less hazardous than some other types of power generation facilities, yet there are still potential risks to be aware of.

Fire Risk

One of the primary risks associated with biomass power plants during earthquakes is the potential for fires. The shaking during an earthquake can damage electrical systems, equipment, and fuel storage, which may lead to electrical faults and fires.

Fuel Handling

Earthquakes can disrupt the fuel handling systems in a biomass plant, potentially causing spills or accidents related to the storage and transportation of biomass feedstock.

It's important to note that the specific risks associated with biomass power plants can vary based on factors such as plant size, location, and design. The biomass power industry prioritizes safety and works closely with regulatory authorities to ensure that biomass energy is generated with minimal risk to people and the environment, even in earthquake-prone regions.

Data Information

Information found on this page is a derivative set, based on sources mentioned below.

Data Sources

We aggregate and combine data from USGS (United States Geographical Survey) and the EMSC (European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre). This allow us to get near real-time and historical earthquake data dating back to the year 1950.

Disclaimer

Information or data found on this page should not be used for, or as an early warning system. It is intended as an historical reference or near real-time complementary information to offical and governmental sources. In an event of an emergency it is important closely monitor and follow advice from national, state and local authorities.

Magnitude 2.5 Earthquake Struck 0 km SSW of Tilleur, Belgium on June 19, 2008 03:12:22
Date and Time
2008-06-19 03:12:22 (UTC)
Magnitude
2.5 Magnitude (richter scle)
Depth
10.0 km
Reports
0 people has reported that they felt this earthquake
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