Magnitude 2.8 Earthquake Struck 0 km SW of Gerde, France on July 19, 2008 23:31:17

Last Updated: 2014-11-07 01:36:40

On July 19, 2008 23:31:17 an earthquake with magnitude of 2.8 on the richter scale hit 0 km SW of Gerde, France. The earthquake originated at a depth of approximately 5.0 kilometers below the Earth's surface on longitude 0.160° and latitude 43.050°. According to documented reports people felt the earth quake, No tsunami was triggered due to the earthquake.

Magnitude & Depth

The earthquake that appeared on July 19, 2008 23:31:17 had a magnitude of 2.8 on the richter scale. Which is considered to be a minor earthquake and is often felt but causes little to no damage.

Shallow earthquakes are considered between 0 and 70 km deep, while intermediate earthquakes range from 70 - 300 km deep and deep earthquakes are between 300 - 700 km deep.

Are shallow earthquakes more destructive?

Shallow quakes generally tend to be more damaging than deeper quakes. Seismic waves from deep quakes have to travel farther to the surface, losing energy along the way.

Nearby Cities and Towns

The nearest significant population center is Gerde in Occitanie, France, located 0 kilometers or 0 miles ↑ N of the earthquake's epicenter. Other cities in close proximity include Bagnères-de-Bigorre (Occitanie, France) located 1 km (1 mi) ↖ NW and Département des Hautes-Pyrénées (Occitanie, France) located 2 km (1 mi) → E of the epicenter.

In total, we found 117 cities in our database that might have been impacted by the earthquake.

Distance Direction City State Country
0 km (0 mi) ↑ N Gerde Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
1 km (1 mi) ↖ NW Bagnères-de-Bigorre Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
2 km (1 mi) → E Département des Hautes-Pyrénées Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
4 km (2 mi) ↖ NW Pouzac Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
4 km (2 mi) ↘ SE Campan Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
14 km (8 mi) ↗ NE Capvern Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
16 km (10 mi) ↖ NW Barbazan-Debat Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
16 km (10 mi) ↖ NW Horgues Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
16 km (10 mi) ↑ N Tournay Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
18 km (11 mi) ↖ NW Laloubère Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
18 km (11 mi) ↖ NW Odos Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
18 km (11 mi) ↗ NE La Barthe-de-Neste Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
18 km (11 mi) ↖ NW Soues Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
19 km (12 mi) ↖ NW Juillan Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
20 km (12 mi) ↖ NW Séméac Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
20 km (12 mi) ↗ NE Lannemezan Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
21 km (13 mi) ↖ NW Tarbes Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
22 km (13 mi) ↖ NW Aureilhan Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
24 km (15 mi) ↖ NW Ibos Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
25 km (15 mi) ↖ NW Orleix Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
27 km (17 mi) ↖ NW Bazet Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
28 km (17 mi) ↖ NW Oursbelille Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
29 km (18 mi) ↘ SE Saint-Lary-Soulan Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
31 km (19 mi) ↖ NW Andrest Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
33 km (20 mi) ↗ NE Gourdan-Polignan Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
33 km (20 mi) ↗ NE Montréjeau Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
35 km (22 mi) ↑ N Trie-sur-Baïse Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
37 km (23 mi) ↖ NW Rabastens-de-Bigorre Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
38 km (23 mi) ↖ NW Vic-en-Bigorre Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
41 km (25 mi) ↗ NE Villeneuve-de-Rivière Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
41 km (25 mi) ↗ NE Labarthe-Rivière Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
43 km (27 mi) ↑ N Miélan Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
45 km (28 mi) → E Bagnères-de-Luchon Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
46 km (28 mi) ↘ SE Bielsa Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
46 km (28 mi) ↗ NE Saint-Gaudens Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
47 km (29 mi) ↖ NW Maubourguet Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
48 km (30 mi) ↗ NE Boulogne-sur-Gesse Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
52 km (32 mi) → E Aspet Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
52 km (32 mi) → E Les Lleida 🇪🇸 Spain
52 km (32 mi) ↘ SE Gistaín Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
52 km (32 mi) ↑ N Marciac Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
54 km (33 mi) ↑ N Masseube Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
54 km (33 mi) ↘ SE Plan Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
55 km (34 mi) ↑ N Mirande Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
55 km (34 mi) ↓ S Puértolas Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
57 km (35 mi) ↘ SE Benasque Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
58 km (36 mi) ↘ SE Sahún Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
60 km (37 mi) ↑ N Seissan Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
60 km (37 mi) ↓ S Laspuña Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
61 km (38 mi) ↗ NE Aurignac Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
61 km (37 mi) ↘ SE Sesué Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
63 km (39 mi) ↘ SE Chía Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
65 km (40 mi) ↘ SE Castejón de Sos Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
65 km (40 mi) ↗ NE Salies-du-Salat Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
66 km (41 mi) ↗ NE L’Isle-en-Dodon Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
66 km (41 mi) ↓ S Labuerda Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
67 km (42 mi) ↘ SE Bisaurri Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
67 km (42 mi) ↓ S Boltaña Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
67 km (41 mi) ↘ SE Seira Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
70 km (44 mi) ↗ NE Martres-Tolosane Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
70 km (43 mi) ↓ S Aínsa Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
73 km (45 mi) ↘ SE Laspaúles Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
77 km (47 mi) ↗ NE Cazères Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
77 km (47 mi) ↗ NE Lombez Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
77 km (48 mi) ↗ NE Le Fousseret Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
79 km (49 mi) ↗ NE Samatan Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
79 km (49 mi) → E Saint-Lizier Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
80 km (50 mi) ↘ SE Bonansa Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
80 km (50 mi) → E Saint-Girons Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
81 km (50 mi) → E Montjoie-en-Couserans Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
81 km (50 mi) ↘ SE Palo Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
87 km (54 mi) ↗ NE Rieux-Volvestre Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
87 km (54 mi) ↗ NE Rieumes Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
88 km (54 mi) ↗ NE Montesquieu-Volvestre Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
89 km (55 mi) ↘ SE Abizanda Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
90 km (56 mi) ↓ S Bárcabo Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
90 km (56 mi) ↗ NE Carbonne Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
90 km (55 mi) ↗ NE Bérat Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
91 km (57 mi) → E Espot Lleida 🇪🇸 Spain
92 km (57 mi) ↗ NE Marquefave Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
93 km (58 mi) ↗ NE Longages Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
93 km (58 mi) ↗ NE Haute-Garonne Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
93 km (58 mi) ↗ NE Sainte-Foy-de-Peyrolières Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
95 km (59 mi) ↗ NE Lherm Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
95 km (59 mi) ↓ S Naval Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
96 km (60 mi) ↘ SE Capella Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
96 km (60 mi) ↗ NE Saint-Lys Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
96 km (60 mi) ↘ SE Graus Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
96 km (60 mi) ↗ NE Noé Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
97 km (60 mi) ↗ NE Lavernose-Lacasse Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
97 km (60 mi) ↗ NE Lacasse Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
98 km (61 mi) ↗ NE Labastidette Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
99 km (61 mi) ↗ NE Le Fauga Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
99 km (61 mi) ↗ NE Lézat-sur-Lèze Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
99 km (61 mi) ↘ SE Lascuarre Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
99 km (61 mi) ↗ NE Saint-Sulpice-sur-Lèze Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
100 km (62 mi) ↗ NE Fontenilles Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
100 km (62 mi) ↘ SE Castigaleu Huesca 🇪🇸 Spain
100 km (62 mi) ↗ NE Pujaudran Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
101 km (63 mi) ↗ NE Fonsorbes Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
103 km (64 mi) ↗ NE Beaumont-sur-Lèze Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
104 km (65 mi) ↗ NE Muret Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
105 km (65 mi) ↗ NE Seysses Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
105 km (65 mi) ↗ NE Eaunes Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
106 km (66 mi) → E Sort Lleida 🇪🇸 Spain
107 km (66 mi) ↗ NE La Salvetat-Saint-Gilles Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
107 km (66 mi) ↗ NE Frouzins Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
107 km (66 mi) ↗ NE Lagardelle-sur-Lèze Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
107 km (66 mi) ↗ NE Saubens Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
108 km (67 mi) ↗ NE Plaisance-du-Touch Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
109 km (68 mi) → E Farrera Lleida 🇪🇸 Spain
109 km (67 mi) ↗ NE Villeneuve-Tolosane Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
109 km (68 mi) ↗ NE Labarthe-sur-Lèze Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
109 km (68 mi) ↗ NE Roquettes Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
110 km (68 mi) ↗ NE Cugnaux Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
111 km (69 mi) ↗ NE Tournefeuille Occitanie 🇫🇷 France
111 km (69 mi) ↗ NE Pinsaguel Occitanie 🇫🇷 France

Nearby Power Plants

We found a total 69 utility-scale power plants in the vecinity of the earthquakes epicenter. Ranging form closest to furtherst, one of these is a neaclear power plant.

Distance Direction Power Plant Type Capacity
8 km (5 mi) ↓ S Bagnères-de-Bigorre Hydro 2.13 MW
10 km (6 mi) ↘ SE Campan Hydro 9.91 MW
15 km (9 mi) ↖ NW Bénac Biomass 1.67 MW
15 km (9 mi) ↙ SW Beaucens Hydro 3.014 MW
17 km (11 mi) → E Beyrède-Jumet Hydro 9.5 MW
20 km (12 mi) ↘ SE Arreau Hydro 10.495 MW
21 km (13 mi) ↖ NW Tarbes Solar 1.13639 MW
24 km (15 mi) ↗ NE Uglas Solar 1.71416 MW
25 km (15 mi) ↘ SE Guchen Hydro 6.5 MW
26 km (16 mi) ↓ S Luz-Saint-Sauveur Hydro 3.071 MW
28 km (17 mi) ↓ S PRAGNERES Hydro 189.2 MW
29 km (18 mi) ↘ SE Aragnouet Hydro 10.255 MW
34 km (21 mi) → E Eget Hydro 37.3 MW
35 km (21 mi) ↘ SE Louron Hydro 49.3 MW
38 km (23 mi) ↘ SE Génos Hydro 1.312 MW
38 km (23 mi) ↗ NE Pointis-de-Rivière Hydro 7.015 MW
38 km (24 mi) ↖ NW Vic-en-Bigorre Solar 1.45188 MW
38 km (23 mi) ↘ SE Germ Hydro 3.1 MW
41 km (26 mi) ↘ SE Loudenvielle Hydro 7.7 MW
41 km (25 mi) → E Cierp-Gaud Hydro 11.0 MW
42 km (26 mi) ↗ NE Lodes Solar 1.01705 MW
42 km (26 mi) → E Oo Hydro 30.0 MW
43 km (27 mi) ↑ N Sainte-Dode Solar 1.4495 MW
44 km (27 mi) ↗ NE Valentine Hydro 8.2 MW
46 km (29 mi) ↑ N Saint-Michel Solar 1.68546 MW
46 km (29 mi) ↗ NE Saint-Gaudens Biomass 1.74 MW
46 km (29 mi) → E Saint-Aventin Hydro 1.43 MW
47 km (29 mi) ↘ SE Portillon (Le) Hydro 95.0 MW
47 km (29 mi) → E Arlos Hydro 5.3 MW
48 km (30 mi) ↗ NE Miramont-de-Comminges Hydro 4.7 MW
50 km (31 mi) ↑ N Berdoues Solar 1.6426 MW
50 km (31 mi) ↑ N Belloc-Saint-Clamens Solar 1.0357 MW
51 km (32 mi) ↗ NE Pointis-Inard Hydro 4.55 MW
52 km (32 mi) ↘ SE SALINAS BRAS DEL PORT S.A. Gas 10.0 MW
52 km (32 mi) ↘ SE LAFORTUNADA CINCA 1 Hydro 41.4 MW
52 km (32 mi) → E PONT DE REI 1 Hydro 46.14 MW
52 km (32 mi) → E Fos Hydro 10.6 MW
52 km (32 mi) ↘ SE LAFORTUNADA CINQUETA 1 Hydro 40.8 MW
55 km (34 mi) ↑ N Mirande Solar 15.65343 MW
56 km (35 mi) ↑ N Gremirande Solar 9.1 MW
56 km (35 mi) ↗ NE Castillon-de-Saint-Martory Hydro 1.9 MW
57 km (35 mi) → E BARRADOS Hydro 15.88 MW
57 km (35 mi) ↘ SE ERISTE 1 Hydro 87.6 MW
63 km (39 mi) ↗ NE Saint-Martory Solar 1.48998 MW
64 km (40 mi) → E VIELHA 1 Hydro 21.86 MW
64 km (40 mi) → E VETEJAR Oil 12.9 MW
64 km (40 mi) ↗ NE Mancioux Hydro 1.8 MW
65 km (40 mi) ↗ NE L'Isle-en-Dodon Solar 2.26612 MW
66 km (41 mi) ↗ NE Touille Hydro 1.925 MW
68 km (42 mi) ↗ NE La Bastide-du-Salat Hydro 1.24 MW
71 km (44 mi) ↘ SE MORALETS 1 Hydro 219.14 MW
74 km (46 mi) → E Castillon-en-Couserans Hydro 13.29 MW
77 km (48 mi) ↗ NE Le Fousseret Solar 1.03666 MW
78 km (49 mi) → E Saint-Lizier Hydro 3.107 MW
80 km (49 mi) ↘ SE CALDES 2 Hydro 32.48 MW
81 km (50 mi) ↘ SE MEDIANO 1 Hydro 66.97 MW
81 km (50 mi) → E Saint-Girons Hydro 4.79 MW
83 km (52 mi) ↗ NE Gratens Solar 1.48365 MW
83 km (51 mi) → E Lacourt Hydro 3.6 MW
93 km (58 mi) ↗ NE Daumazan-sur-Arize Solar 10.45652 MW
94 km (58 mi) ↘ SE ESCALES 1 Hydro 35.85 MW
95 km (59 mi) → E MONTAMARA 1 Hydro 92.42 MW
96 km (59 mi) ↗ NE Lavernose Solar 4.6 MW
100 km (62 mi) → E TAVASCAN INFERIOR Hydro 150.88 MW
100 km (62 mi) ↗ NE Fontenilles Solar 7.16417 MW
104 km (64 mi) ↗ NE Seysses Solar 4.54416 MW
105 km (65 mi) → E LLAVORSI CARDOS 1 Hydro 52.4 MW
107 km (66 mi) ↗ NE Plaisance-du-Touch Solar 2.62341 MW
113 km (70 mi) ↗ NE Portet-sur-Garonne Solar 2.12132 MW

Power Plants & Risks During Earthquakes

We found 5 types of power plants in the vecinity of the magnitude 2.8 earthquake that struck 0 km SW of Gerde, France on July 19, 2008 23:31:17. These types were Solar power plants, Biomass power plants, Oil power plants, Hydro power plants, Gas power plants, below you find information how each type of power plant can pose a risk to you as a person or the ecosytem around you.

None of this information should be used as guidence in an event of an emergency, but rather as additional references to information provided by national, state and local authorities.

Hydropower

Hydropower plants are generally considered as safe in many aspects, but when it comes to severe earthquakes they pose a substantial risk that can manifest in the form of dam faliours, landslides and grave impacts on surrounding ecosystems.

Dam Failure

The most significant risk is the potential failure of the dam that holds the water reservoir. Severe ground shaking can damage or breach the dam, leading to downstream flooding and as a result endangering people and wildlife living downstream. Such an event can also have severe impact on key infrastructure that cascades through society.

Landslides

Earthquakes can trigger landslides in the areas surrounding hydropower plants, potentially damaging infrastructure and causing harm to nearby communities.

Damage to Aquatic Ecosystems

Both landslide and dam failures can have a severe impact on upstream and downstream aquatic wildlife, ecosystem and groundwater, resulting in longterm risks for people and industires living and operating in areas near the water supply.

To mitigate these risks, engineering and construction standards for hydropower plants often include earthquake-resistant designs. These designs incorporate measures such as flexible foundations, strengthened dam structures, and advanced monitoring systems to detect early signs of stress. Additionally, emergency plans and evacuation procedures should be in place to protect personnel and downstream communities in the event of a severe earthquake.

Gas Power

Gas power plants can pose significant risks to people and the environment in their vicinity during earthquakes.

Gas Leaks and Fires

Gas power plants rely on natural gas, which can leak from pipelines and equipment when damaged by seismic activity. These leaks can lead to fires and explosions, endangering people in the plant's vicinity.

Impact on Air Quality

Gas power plants emit pollutants, and fires caused by gas leaks during an earthquake can release harmful substances into the air. This can pose health risks to nearby residents.

Environmental Impact

Gas leaks can also harm the local environment, potentially contaminating soil and water sources.

To mitigate these risks, most modern gas power plants have robust safety measures in place, including gas leak detection systems, emergency response plans, and communication protocols to alert nearby communities in case of an incident. Additionally, local authorities should conduct risk assessments and ensure that emergency services are well-prepared to respond to potential hazards posed by gas power plants during earthquakes.

Solar Power

Solar power plants generally pose fewer risks compared to conventional power plants that use fossil fuels or nuclear energy. However, they are not without their own set of potential risks and challenges. Below you can find some of the risks associated with solar power plants in an event of a severe earthquake.

Environmental Impact

The production of solar panels involves the use of various materials, including rare metals and chemicals. Severe earthquakes could potentially introduce these into the ecosystems of their location.

Fire Risk

Although the solar panels themselves are not typically a fire hazard, electrical components like inverters and batterises that store the electricity can pose a risk. Electrical malfunctions or faults can lead to fires, especially in poorly maintained systems in an event of a severe earthquake, and thus pose a longterm risk for the local ecosystem.

Overall, the mitigation of risks associated with utility-scale solar power plants involves a combination of technological advancements, sustainable practices, regulatory adherence, and ongoing monitoring and maintenance.

Oil Power

Oil-fired power plants can pose significant risks to society, people, and ecosystems in the event of a severe earthquake.

Oil Spills & Fires

One of the most immediate dangers is the risk of oil spills and fires. The shaking during an earthquake can rupture storage tanks and pipelines, leading to the release of large quantities of oil. Spilled oil can catch fire, causing explosions and further environmental damage.

Air Quality Polution

Oil fires and releases can result in the release of toxic fumes and particulate matter into the air. This can lead to poor air quality, posing health risks to nearby communities. People exposed to these pollutants may experience respiratory issues and other health problems.

Water Pollution

Spilled oil can contaminate nearby water bodies, including rivers, lakes, and groundwater. This can harm aquatic ecosystems, killing fish and other wildlife, and disrupting the food chain. Drinking water supplies may also be compromised, impacting human health.

Soil Contamination

Oil spills can saturate the soil, making it less fertile and potentially rendering it unusable for agriculture. Soil contamination can persist for years, affecting local food production.

Long-Term Environmental Damage

The environmental damage caused by oil spills and fires can persist long after the earthquake event. Cleanup efforts can be costly and challenging, and ecosystems may take years or even decades to recover fully.

To mitigate these risks, most modern oil-fired power plants follow strict regulations, safety measures, and extensive emergency response plans are in place for oil power plants located in seismically active regions. This includes robust containment systems, automatic shutdown mechanisms, and well-trained response teams.

Biomass Power

Biomass power plants, which generate electricity by burning organic materials like wood, agricultural residues, or waste, can pose certain risks during earthquakes. While biomass power plants are generally considered less hazardous than some other types of power generation facilities, yet there are still potential risks to be aware of.

Fire Risk

One of the primary risks associated with biomass power plants during earthquakes is the potential for fires. The shaking during an earthquake can damage electrical systems, equipment, and fuel storage, which may lead to electrical faults and fires.

Fuel Handling

Earthquakes can disrupt the fuel handling systems in a biomass plant, potentially causing spills or accidents related to the storage and transportation of biomass feedstock.

It's important to note that the specific risks associated with biomass power plants can vary based on factors such as plant size, location, and design. The biomass power industry prioritizes safety and works closely with regulatory authorities to ensure that biomass energy is generated with minimal risk to people and the environment, even in earthquake-prone regions.

Data Information

Information found on this page is a derivative set, based on sources mentioned below.

Data Sources

We aggregate and combine data from USGS (United States Geographical Survey) and the EMSC (European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre). This allow us to get near real-time and historical earthquake data dating back to the year 1950.

Disclaimer

Information or data found on this page should not be used for, or as an early warning system. It is intended as an historical reference or near real-time complementary information to offical and governmental sources. In an event of an emergency it is important closely monitor and follow advice from national, state and local authorities.

Magnitude 2.8 Earthquake Struck 0 km SW of Gerde, France on July 19, 2008 23:31:17
Date and Time
2008-07-19 23:31:17 (UTC)
Magnitude
2.8 Magnitude (richter scle)
Depth
5.0 km
Reports
0 people has reported that they felt this earthquake
Did you feel this earthquake?