Magnitude 2.6 Earthquake Struck 6 km SSE of Morón de la Frontera, Spain on October 14, 2008 10:25:01

Last Updated: 2014-11-07 01:37:28

On October 14, 2008 10:25:01 an earthquake with magnitude of 2.6 on the richter scale hit 6 km SSE of Morón de la Frontera, Spain. The earthquake originated at a depth of approximately 17.9 kilometers below the Earth's surface on longitude -5.425° and latitude 37.066°. According to documented reports people felt the earth quake, No tsunami was triggered due to the earthquake.

Magnitude & Depth

The earthquake that appeared on October 14, 2008 10:25:01 had a magnitude of 2.6 on the richter scale. Which is considered to be a minor earthquake and is often felt but causes little to no damage.

Shallow earthquakes are considered between 0 and 70 km deep, while intermediate earthquakes range from 70 - 300 km deep and deep earthquakes are between 300 - 700 km deep.

Are shallow earthquakes more destructive?

Shallow quakes generally tend to be more damaging than deeper quakes. Seismic waves from deep quakes have to travel farther to the surface, losing energy along the way.

Nearby Cities and Towns

The nearest significant population center is Morón de la Frontera in Sevilla, Spain, located 6 kilometers or 4 miles ↖ NW of the earthquake's epicenter. Other cities in close proximity include Coripe (Sevilla, Spain) located 10 km (6 mi) ↓ S and Montellano (Sevilla, Spain) located 15 km (9 mi) ↙ SW of the epicenter.

In total, we found 137 cities in our database that might have been impacted by the earthquake.

Distance Direction City State Country
6 km (4 mi) ↖ NW Morón de la Frontera Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
10 km (6 mi) ↓ S Coripe Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
15 km (9 mi) ↙ SW Montellano Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
19 km (11 mi) ↓ S Puerto Serrano Cádiz 🇪🇸 Spain
20 km (12 mi) ↘ SE Algodonales Cádiz 🇪🇸 Spain
20 km (12 mi) ↘ SE Olvera Cádiz 🇪🇸 Spain
20 km (12 mi) → E Pruna Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
22 km (13 mi) → E Villanueva de San Juan Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
23 km (14 mi) → E Torre Alháquime Cádiz 🇪🇸 Spain
25 km (16 mi) ↖ NW Paradas Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
25 km (15 mi) → E Algámitas Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
25 km (15 mi) ↘ SE Zahara Cádiz 🇪🇸 Spain
28 km (17 mi) → E Alcalá del Valle Cádiz 🇪🇸 Spain
29 km (18 mi) ↑ N Marchena Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
31 km (19 mi) ↘ SE Setenil de las Bodegas Cádiz 🇪🇸 Spain
33 km (20 mi) ↓ S Prado del Rey Cádiz 🇪🇸 Spain
34 km (21 mi) ↗ NE Osuna Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
34 km (21 mi) ↘ SE Grazalema Cádiz 🇪🇸 Spain
36 km (22 mi) → E Almargen Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
37 km (23 mi) → E Cañete la Real Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
38 km (24 mi) ↘ SE Arriate Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
39 km (24 mi) → E Cuevas del Becerro Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
39 km (24 mi) ↘ SE Montejaque Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
40 km (25 mi) ↘ SE Benaocaz Cádiz 🇪🇸 Spain
41 km (25 mi) ↘ SE Benaoján Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
41 km (25 mi) ↗ NE Martín de la Jara Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
41 km (25 mi) ↘ SE Villaluenga del Rosario Cádiz 🇪🇸 Spain
42 km (26 mi) ↘ SE Ronda Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
43 km (27 mi) ↗ NE Aguadulce Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
43 km (26 mi) ↓ S Ubrique Cádiz 🇪🇸 Spain
44 km (27 mi) ↑ N Fuentes de Andalucía Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
45 km (28 mi) → E Teba Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
48 km (29 mi) ↘ SE Jimera de Líbar Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
49 km (31 mi) → E Campillos Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
49 km (30 mi) ↗ NE Gilena Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
49 km (30 mi) ↗ NE Sierra de Yeguas Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
49 km (31 mi) ↘ SE Atajate Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
50 km (31 mi) ↗ NE Pedrera Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
50 km (31 mi) ↘ SE Cortes de la Frontera Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
51 km (32 mi) ↘ SE Alpandeire Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
52 km (32 mi) ↘ SE Parauta Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
52 km (32 mi) ↘ SE Cartajima Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
53 km (33 mi) ↗ NE Marinaleda Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
54 km (33 mi) ↗ NE Estepa Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
54 km (33 mi) ↘ SE Benalauría Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
54 km (33 mi) ↘ SE Faraján Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
54 km (33 mi) ↘ SE Júzcar Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
55 km (34 mi) ↘ SE Igualeja Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
55 km (34 mi) → E Ardales Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
56 km (35 mi) ↘ SE Algatocín Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
56 km (34 mi) ↘ SE Pujerra Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
57 km (35 mi) ↗ NE Lora de Estepa Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
58 km (36 mi) → E Carratraca Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
58 km (36 mi) ↘ SE Jubrique Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
58 km (36 mi) → E Yunquera Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
60 km (37 mi) ↑ N Écija Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
60 km (37 mi) ↗ NE Herrera Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
60 km (37 mi) → E Casarabonela Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
62 km (38 mi) → E Tolox Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
62 km (38 mi) ↑ N Cañada Rosal Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
62 km (38 mi) ↗ NE Fuente de Piedra Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
62 km (39 mi) → E Alozaina Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
64 km (39 mi) ↗ NE Casariche Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
64 km (39 mi) ↗ NE Humilladero Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
66 km (41 mi) ↖ NW Lora del Río Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
68 km (42 mi) ↗ NE Mollina Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
68 km (42 mi) ↘ SE Istán Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
69 km (43 mi) ↗ NE Alameda Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
69 km (43 mi) → E Guaro Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
69 km (43 mi) → E Alora Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
71 km (44 mi) ↑ N Palma del Río Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
71 km (44 mi) → E Monda Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
71 km (44 mi) → E Pizarra Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
71 km (44 mi) ↑ N Peñaflor Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
71 km (44 mi) ↗ NE Badolatosa Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
74 km (46 mi) → E Coín Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
75 km (46 mi) ↘ SE Ojén Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
75 km (46 mi) ↑ N Santaella Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
76 km (47 mi) → E Antequera Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
76 km (47 mi) ↑ N Fuente Palmera Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
77 km (48 mi) ↗ NE Palenciana Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
80 km (50 mi) → E Cártama Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
80 km (50 mi) → E Alhaurín el Grande Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
81 km (50 mi) ↗ NE Benamejí Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
82 km (51 mi) ↗ NE Montalbán de Córdoba Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
83 km (51 mi) → E Almogía Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
83 km (51 mi) ↗ NE Moriles Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
84 km (52 mi) ↑ N San Sebastián de los Ballesteros Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
85 km (52 mi) ↗ NE Cuevas Bajas Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
86 km (53 mi) ↑ N Posadas Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
86 km (54 mi) ↑ N Hornachuelos Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
86 km (53 mi) ↗ NE Encinas Reales Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
87 km (54 mi) ↗ NE Villanueva de Algaidas Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
87 km (54 mi) ↑ N Guadalcázar Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
87 km (54 mi) ↗ NE Monturque Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
87 km (54 mi) → E Mijas Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
88 km (55 mi) → E Alhaurín de la Torre Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
90 km (56 mi) ↗ NE Montilla Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
90 km (56 mi) ↖ NW Constantina Sevilla 🇪🇸 Spain
90 km (56 mi) ↑ N Almodóvar del Río Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
90 km (56 mi) → E Casabermeja Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
91 km (57 mi) ↗ NE Archidona Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
91 km (56 mi) ↑ N Fernán-Núñez Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
91 km (56 mi) ↗ NE Lucena Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
91 km (56 mi) ↑ N Montemayor Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
92 km (57 mi) → E Benalmádena Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
92 km (57 mi) ↗ NE Cuevas de San Marcos Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
94 km (58 mi) → E Villanueva del Rosario Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
96 km (59 mi) → E Villanueva del Trabuco Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
96 km (59 mi) → E Torremolinos Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
97 km (60 mi) ↗ NE Rute Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
97 km (60 mi) ↗ NE Villanueva de Tapia Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
97 km (60 mi) → E Málaga Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
98 km (61 mi) → E Colmenar Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
98 km (60 mi) ↗ NE Cabra Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
101 km (62 mi) ↗ NE Iznájar Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
101 km (63 mi) → E Ríogordo Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
102 km (63 mi) ↗ NE Espejo Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
103 km (64 mi) → E Alfarnate Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
103 km (64 mi) → E Alfarnatejo Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
105 km (65 mi) → E Totalán Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
107 km (66 mi) → E Comares Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
108 km (67 mi) ↗ NE Doña Mencía Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
108 km (67 mi) ↑ N Córdoba Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
108 km (67 mi) ↗ NE Castro del Río Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
109 km (67 mi) → E Rincón de la Victoria Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
109 km (67 mi) → E Moclinejo Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
109 km (68 mi) → E Cútar Málaga 🇪🇸 Spain
110 km (68 mi) ↗ NE Carcabuey Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
111 km (69 mi) ↗ NE Zuheros Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
115 km (71 mi) ↗ NE Baena Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
115 km (71 mi) ↗ NE Luque Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
126 km (78 mi) ↑ N Villafranca de Córdoba Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
130 km (81 mi) ↑ N Bujalance Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
131 km (81 mi) ↑ N Pedro Abad Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
132 km (82 mi) ↗ NE Cañete de las Torres Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain
132 km (82 mi) ↗ NE Valenzuela Córdoba 🇪🇸 Spain

Nearby Power Plants

We found a total 34 utility-scale power plants in the vecinity of the earthquakes epicenter. Ranging form closest to furtherst, one of these is a neaclear power plant.

Distance Direction Power Plant Type Capacity
14 km (8 mi) ← W Arenales Solar 50.0 MW
15 km (9 mi) ← W Morón Solar 50.0 MW
17 km (11 mi) ← W El Coronil II Solar 10.2 MW
55 km (34 mi) ↑ N Gemasol Solar 19.9 MW
55 km (34 mi) → E PARQUE EOLICO CERRO DE LA HIGUERA Wind 36.0 MW
61 km (38 mi) ↑ N PLANTA SOLAR TERMICA HELIOENERGY 1 Solar 100.0 MW
61 km (38 mi) ↑ N PLANTA SECADO TERMICO DE LODOS E.R.A.R. DE BUTARQUE Gas 18.0 MW
61 km (38 mi) → E TAJO DE LA ENCANTADA 1 Hydro 376.88 MW
62 km (38 mi) ↗ NE PLANTA COGENERACION BECOSA -FUENTE PIEDRA Waste 16.434 MW
66 km (41 mi) ↑ N SOLUZ GUZMAN Solar 49.9 MW
66 km (41 mi) ↑ N PST PALMA DEL RIO I Solar 49.9 MW
66 km (41 mi) ↑ N Algarrobo Solar 5.6 MW
66 km (41 mi) ↑ N Palma del Río II Solar 50.0 MW
66 km (41 mi) ↑ N Palma del Rio CSP Solar 100.0 MW
77 km (48 mi) ↗ NE Morita Solar 8.7 MW
83 km (51 mi) ↑ N La Rambla Solar 5.7 MW
83 km (51 mi) ↑ N Fuente Palmera Solar 6.1 MW
83 km (51 mi) ↑ N CENTRAL TERMOSOLAR LA AFRICANA Solar 49.9 MW
84 km (52 mi) → E MALA1 (CTCC MALAGA) Gas 415.509 MW
86 km (54 mi) ↑ N BEMBEZAR Hydro 14.86 MW
86 km (53 mi) ↑ N La Quintana Solar 9.8 MW
88 km (54 mi) ↗ NE Archidona Solar 7.3 MW
90 km (56 mi) ↑ N P.E. ALMODOVAR II Wind 28.5 MW
92 km (57 mi) ↗ NE IZNAJAR 1 Hydro 76.71 MW
94 km (58 mi) ↑ N Almodóvar del Río E Solar 9.6 MW
94 km (58 mi) ↑ N Almodóvar del Río W Solar 9.6 MW
97 km (60 mi) ↗ NE Sierresita Solar 10.0 MW
98 km (60 mi) ↗ NE Cortijo Viejo Solar 10.0 MW
107 km (66 mi) → E Moclinejo Solar 7.0 MW
115 km (71 mi) ↗ NE AGROENERGETICA DE BAENA Biomass 20.0 MW
115 km (71 mi) ↑ N Alcolea I+II Solar 9.3 MW
128 km (79 mi) ↑ N PST SOLACOR 1 Solar 100.0 MW
128 km (79 mi) ↑ N Solacor 2 Solar 50.0 MW
129 km (80 mi) ↑ N Quintanilla Solar 9.5 MW

Power Plants & Risks During Earthquakes

We found 6 types of power plants in the vecinity of the magnitude 2.6 earthquake that struck 6 km SSE of Morón de la Frontera, Spain on October 14, 2008 10:25:01. These types were Solar power plants, Wind power plants, Hydro power plants, Waste power plants, Biomass power plants, Gas power plants, below you find information how each type of power plant can pose a risk to you as a person or the ecosytem around you.

None of this information should be used as guidence in an event of an emergency, but rather as additional references to information provided by national, state and local authorities.

Hydropower

Hydropower plants are generally considered as safe in many aspects, but when it comes to severe earthquakes they pose a substantial risk that can manifest in the form of dam faliours, landslides and grave impacts on surrounding ecosystems.

Dam Failure

The most significant risk is the potential failure of the dam that holds the water reservoir. Severe ground shaking can damage or breach the dam, leading to downstream flooding and as a result endangering people and wildlife living downstream. Such an event can also have severe impact on key infrastructure that cascades through society.

Landslides

Earthquakes can trigger landslides in the areas surrounding hydropower plants, potentially damaging infrastructure and causing harm to nearby communities.

Damage to Aquatic Ecosystems

Both landslide and dam failures can have a severe impact on upstream and downstream aquatic wildlife, ecosystem and groundwater, resulting in longterm risks for people and industires living and operating in areas near the water supply.

To mitigate these risks, engineering and construction standards for hydropower plants often include earthquake-resistant designs. These designs incorporate measures such as flexible foundations, strengthened dam structures, and advanced monitoring systems to detect early signs of stress. Additionally, emergency plans and evacuation procedures should be in place to protect personnel and downstream communities in the event of a severe earthquake.

Gas Power

Gas power plants can pose significant risks to people and the environment in their vicinity during earthquakes.

Gas Leaks and Fires

Gas power plants rely on natural gas, which can leak from pipelines and equipment when damaged by seismic activity. These leaks can lead to fires and explosions, endangering people in the plant's vicinity.

Impact on Air Quality

Gas power plants emit pollutants, and fires caused by gas leaks during an earthquake can release harmful substances into the air. This can pose health risks to nearby residents.

Environmental Impact

Gas leaks can also harm the local environment, potentially contaminating soil and water sources.

To mitigate these risks, most modern gas power plants have robust safety measures in place, including gas leak detection systems, emergency response plans, and communication protocols to alert nearby communities in case of an incident. Additionally, local authorities should conduct risk assessments and ensure that emergency services are well-prepared to respond to potential hazards posed by gas power plants during earthquakes.

Solar Power

Solar power plants generally pose fewer risks compared to conventional power plants that use fossil fuels or nuclear energy. However, they are not without their own set of potential risks and challenges. Below you can find some of the risks associated with solar power plants in an event of a severe earthquake.

Environmental Impact

The production of solar panels involves the use of various materials, including rare metals and chemicals. Severe earthquakes could potentially introduce these into the ecosystems of their location.

Fire Risk

Although the solar panels themselves are not typically a fire hazard, electrical components like inverters and batterises that store the electricity can pose a risk. Electrical malfunctions or faults can lead to fires, especially in poorly maintained systems in an event of a severe earthquake, and thus pose a longterm risk for the local ecosystem.

Overall, the mitigation of risks associated with utility-scale solar power plants involves a combination of technological advancements, sustainable practices, regulatory adherence, and ongoing monitoring and maintenance.

Wind Power

In the event of a severe earthquake, wind power plants typically pose lower risks to people and ecosystems compared to some other types of power generation, such as nuclear or fossil fuel power plants. Below you'll find potential risks to still consider.

Turbine Collapse

The most significant risk to people is the potential collapse of wind turbine towers during a severe earthquake. If a wind turbine were to collapse, it could cause injury or loss of life to anyone in the vicinity.

Wildlife Impact

Wind turbines can pose a risk to local wildlife. In the event of an earthquake, there could be concerns about the displacement or injury of wildlife in the vicinity of the turbines or wild fires resulting from internal malfunction of turbines.

While wind power plants do have risks associated with earthquakes, they are generally considered to be a lower-risk energy source in terms of environmental and safety concerns when compared to certain other forms of power generation. Proper planning, engineering, and maintenance practices help mitigate these risks and ensure the safe operation of wind power plants during earthquakes.

Biomass Power

Biomass power plants, which generate electricity by burning organic materials like wood, agricultural residues, or waste, can pose certain risks during earthquakes. While biomass power plants are generally considered less hazardous than some other types of power generation facilities, yet there are still potential risks to be aware of.

Fire Risk

One of the primary risks associated with biomass power plants during earthquakes is the potential for fires. The shaking during an earthquake can damage electrical systems, equipment, and fuel storage, which may lead to electrical faults and fires.

Fuel Handling

Earthquakes can disrupt the fuel handling systems in a biomass plant, potentially causing spills or accidents related to the storage and transportation of biomass feedstock.

It's important to note that the specific risks associated with biomass power plants can vary based on factors such as plant size, location, and design. The biomass power industry prioritizes safety and works closely with regulatory authorities to ensure that biomass energy is generated with minimal risk to people and the environment, even in earthquake-prone regions.

Data Information

Information found on this page is a derivative set, based on sources mentioned below.

Data Sources

We aggregate and combine data from USGS (United States Geographical Survey) and the EMSC (European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre). This allow us to get near real-time and historical earthquake data dating back to the year 1950.

Disclaimer

Information or data found on this page should not be used for, or as an early warning system. It is intended as an historical reference or near real-time complementary information to offical and governmental sources. In an event of an emergency it is important closely monitor and follow advice from national, state and local authorities.

Magnitude 2.6 Earthquake Struck 6 km SSE of Morón de la Frontera, Spain on October 14, 2008 10:25:01
Date and Time
2008-10-14 10:25:01 (UTC)
Magnitude
2.6 Magnitude (richter scle)
Depth
17.9 km
Reports
0 people has reported that they felt this earthquake
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